9 Responses to “What’s most time consuming?”

  1. T March 14, 2008 at 1:11 PM #

    😎 Thank you, Angie.

  2. Maria Zannini March 15, 2008 at 12:42 AM #

    I have a question that’s come up since I’ve been reading your line edits. :whip:

    How do you reread something numerous times without getting freezer burn from overexposure? Are there any tricks to reviewing with a fresh eye?

    Maria Zannini’s last blog post..Writing Mentors

  3. Katie March 15, 2008 at 10:49 PM #

    Pure curiosity, how long does it approximately take to edit a book and how many stages are there between the rough draft and the end product?

  4. Alexis Fleming March 16, 2008 at 5:41 AM #

    Hi Angie,

    Just had to pop in and say I hope you never give up the editing. I learned more from you through five manuscripts than I learned from any other editor I’ve had. You rock!

    Alex

  5. Angie March 16, 2008 at 8:27 AM #

    How do you reread something numerous times without getting freezer burn from overexposure? Are there any tricks to reviewing with a fresh eye?

    One thing is to take some distance/time between each time you read it. If you’re sending in a submission, don’t send it right after you’ve finished it. Let it sit for a week, send it to critique partners, and then look at it again after a break.

    A trick I learned when I first started proofreading is to read from back to front. That helps keep you from reading for “story” and you see the errors instead. So you read the last page first, and then work backwards. It takes you out of the continuity of the story and focuses you only on the words/grammar/punctuation.

    Otherwise, that’s why editors have to love a book, because you read it so many times, if you don’t love it when you start, you go insane!

    Pure curiosity, how long does it approximately take to edit a book and how many stages are there between the rough draft and the end product?

    Well, I don’t see the book when it’s still at the rough draft stage (or at least I shouldn’t!) so every author has a different process from the rough draft stage–some use critique partners, beta readers, proofreaders, etc. to get the book as polished as possible before it sees the editor. There are some authors who can produce a really clean product without utilizing any of these, but it’s generally not the brand new author and it’s usually someone who’s been multi-published and had the benefit of an editor pointing out some of their bad habits.

    Now, the editing process from submission for Samhain is unique to us, every publisher has a different way of doing things. I just read somewhere…I think on Emily Veinglory’s blog? That someone thinks our editing process is more labor intensive than most. Yay 😉

    Once we accept a submission (we make notes about things we think need editing when reading a submission), the book then gets dropped into our Word template and we do some basic fixes and cleaning up. The book then gets a round of edits from the editor, sent to the author for revisions, back to the editor for a second round and then back to the author for those revisions.Every book gets two rounds, some books get more.

    It’s then off to the copy editor who reads through it a minimum of two times (once through is not enough because it’s only in a second reading that you note inconsistencies between the beginning/end, continuity problems, things that are never resolved, etc.). The copy editor sends it to the editor, who goes over the suggested changes, then sends it to the author for revisions. Author sends it to the editor, who goes over the revisions, makes sure everything is appropriate and there are no lingering, unaddressed issues. The editor then finalizes and sends it off for formatting into the final files the readers buy.

    Just had to pop in and say I hope you never give up the editing. I learned more from you through five manuscripts than I learned from any other editor I’ve had. You rock!

    Thank you so much! You made my day 🙂

  6. Katie March 16, 2008 at 8:38 AM #

    Very interesting, thanks for letting me know :). Yesterday I indulged myself in a lazy Saturday after having studied all week and enjoyed some very good ebooks. The problem was, one book from one of the biggest publishers out there was embarrassingly full of mistakes (that I as a non native speaker could detect) and then I read a book by Samhain, and besides the story being one of the best I read in a long time, there also weren’t any mistakes. YEHA!

  7. Wandering Chopsticks March 17, 2008 at 1:59 PM #

    The multiple edits really pays off. I noticed far, far fewer mistakes with Samhain than any other e-publisher. Also, the formatting of the pages just looks more professional. And even though I buy the e-versions, the covers aren’t so extreme I’d be afraid to be seen in public with the book.

    I have a question about how submissions are done. How does that work with multiple editors? The submissions that come in through the general email address, how does it get determined which editor gets which book? I’m assuming after you’ve signed on an author, they just continue working with you? But what about the new authors?

    I noticed that editors make a big difference in terms of which author I like as well. Or I should say, in general, if I were to look at which books I liked more, they tended to have been edited by a handful of editors. So I wasn’t sure if how much of a role editors had in selecting the books they’d wish to edit in the first place.

    And when do you think you’ll have some editing positions open again? 🙂

    Thanks!

    Wandering Chopsticks’s last blog post..Day 16: “Fruit-shi”

  8. Angie March 18, 2008 at 1:44 PM #

    I have a question about how submissions are done. How does that work with multiple editors? The submissions that come in through the general email address, how does it get determined which editor gets which book? I’m assuming after you’ve signed on an author, they just continue working with you? But what about the new authors?

    We have a submissions coordinator who sends out the submissions to various editors. She does keep track of our genre preferences, and sends based on that. But also, the editors at Samhain are really good about recognizing a well-crafted story that might not work for them personally, so they pass it on. We have an editor’s loop and there’s usually one or two of those “up for grabs” type messages posted every week. We give a well-written book every chance to get signed, but sometimes, even a well-written book lacks that spark to grab us. Sounds confusing, but there you have it 😛

    Current authors continue to work with the editor who contracted them, unless the editor leaves, or the editor/author find that their editorial relationship doesn’t work. Some people just aren’t a good fit for one another.

    So I wasn’t sure if how much of a role editors had in selecting the books they’d wish to edit in the first place.

    And when do you think you’ll have some editing positions open again?

    We sign the majority of books that we edit, but there are almost always books on our schedule that were signed by another editor who had to leave or couldn’t complete the project for some reason. Even books I’ve signed have been completed by someone else. So yes, for the most part, we control our own schedule but not always.

    As for when I’ll be hiring again. Not soon. I sincerely hope I don’t lose any more editors because kick ass editors like we have are hard to find. I hired one this last round out of hundreds of applicants. I’m kind of picky that way, though. And since I have a long schedule of conferences coming up in the next 6 months, I’m going to hope that I won’t be hiring again in 2008!

    Thanks for the compliments about the editing paying off–it’s nice to hear because usually editing isn’t mentioned unless someone thinks it’s bad, lol!

  9. Wandering Chopsticks March 18, 2008 at 2:51 PM #

    Angie,

    Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions so thoroughly. I was always fascinated by how the whole thing worked.

    Wandering Chopsticks’s last blog post..Day 17: Not Quite Corned Beef and Cabbage (Sandwich and Coleslaw)

About Me


Angela James

There is nothing worse than writing a bio. And writing one for your blog sidebar? Blech. Maybe you landed here via Google, followed me from Twitter (does that make you a stalker?) or maybe we met at a conference or you clicked a link from a comment I made at a blog you visited. Hopefully whatever I said didn't make you so mad you came looking for a picture to throw darts at (yep, that's me up above, in my favorite cowboy hat) but instead drove you to find out more about the amazingly witty and intelligent person behind the amazingly witty and intelligent comment.

However you found me, who you found is Angela James, executive editor of Carina Press, Harlequin's new digital-first press. I'm passionate about digital publishing, my mission is to drag people to the digital dark side, one reader (and author) at a time. I'm also Brianna's mommy. At my blog you'll get an odd mix of personal and professional posts about parenting, publishing, books, cooking, sewing and life in general. Come back often, comment frequently and go green—buy ebooks!

Please note that this is my personal blog and my opinions are neither that of Harlequin, nor representative of their opinions.

 

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First, I blog once or twice a week at theCarina Press blog, talking about the job, the authors, the books and other things Carina Press. And, of course, you can always find me on Twitter. Or Facebook, if you prefer (mostly the same content, one feeds the other). I also run the Carina Press Twitter and Facebook accounts. Social media, it's where it's at (well, it's where I'm at, anyway).
 

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