In her blog yesterday Sylvia Day had a brief Q&A from a snippet of a Paraphanelia interview with Audrey LaFehr, the editorial director from Kengsington. It raised a question in my mind…is Kengsington using clever marketing or is it something else? **emphasis is mine in below questions

PNR: Readers are very excited about the new Aphrodisia line; could you tell us how this line differs from the already established Brava Erotic Romance Line?

Audrey L.: While very hot and sexy, Brava still follows the “rules” of traditional romance—one man and one woman fall in love in the course of the book and arrive at some sort of permanent commitment at the end. Aphrodisia throws away the rules—anything goes, as long as it’s super hot, sexy, explicit, legal, and all about a woman’s sexual pleasure. Oftentimes the woman does find and fall in love with her soul mate, but that is not a requirement. However, a happy (or shall we say an extremely satisfying?) ending is a must.

PNR: In your opinion, how far can you go with erotic content and have it still be considered romance?

Audrey L.: Aphrodisia would not be considered romance by many traditionalists. It is categorized as “Erotic Romance” for a simple, practical reason—we want it to be sold to the romance buyer and go into or near the romance section of the bookstore. If it had “Erotica” on the spine, it would go into general fiction or an erotica section if the store has one, and our readers (who are primarily romance readers who want something hotter) would not be able to find our books easily. Other than that, Aphrodisia does not have to conform to the usual parameters of romance.

Perhaps I’m misreading this, but does anyone else read this: “It is categorized as “Erotic Romance” for a simple, practical reason—we want it to be sold to the romance buyer and go into or near the romance section of the bookstore…Other than that, Aphrodisia does not have to conform to the usual parameters of romance.” as saying that other than the label on the spine, it doesn’t conform to romance? as something a little questionable as far as the spirit of romance goes?

It seems she’s basically saying it’s really erotica, but for the sake of marketing, they’ve slapped the label of erotic romance on it. No HEA required (the one Aphrodisia book I read did not have a HEA and had I known that, I would have thought twice about reading it. I like a HEA, it’s why I read romance), just really hot sex. Sounds like erotica to me, but she already said that. So, is this clever marketing or is it something else? Something a little less…honest with the readers?

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